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How WordPress UI And UX Were Improved Through The Years

WordPress designers and developers are obviously familiar with UI and UX particularly nowadays where the user is first priority. Websites are competing for the attention of users and they have to ensure that the user interface and user experience is tailored to each customer’s behaviour and tastes.

The history of UI and UX

Years ago, graphics were created to be able to accommodate screens that only displayed green or ember and where beep sounds came from a built-in speaker. For most systems, UIs were text-only interfaces. In the middle of the 1980’s GUI’s that were developed for years became popular. Graphics were certainly improved but 320 pixels was considered as high resolution. When everything was upgraded during the Pentium years, the design of UIs was based on the general population having 14k modems. This meant going lean with colours, fewer images at lower resolutions and few clickable regions on a page.

After a while design trends started to accommodate 24k modems and then 56k modems. Today, limits are relatively few and the only limitations in website design being the imagination and the abilities of the developer.

UX or user experience has been around since 1990 but it did not include effective factors and behavioural concerns in the design of systems. The term only included more of these factors when the machine age introduced the need for productivity improvement activities that will improve user experience in all aspects of work.

Most of the changes in WordPress UI took place at the backend. The first version of WordPress UI was limited in its features and did not include a dashboard. The 2005 release included a dashboard, added pages and supported multiple themes. The spelling-check was added in the 2007 release including the menu structure for comments, tags, update notifications for new plugins, URL redirect and the button for advanced visual editor.

Over the years many more great improvements were released for both admins and end users. You have the option to get in touch with a WordPress development team on their website to design a site that is true to your brand and vision for both desktop and mobile devices across browsers.

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