Truck Driver Employing Bouncing Back Slowly Following COVID-19

The Canadian trucking economy has been slowly building itself back up following a hard hit from COVID-19, to the relief of companies like Titan Transline and truckers across the country. Speaking of truckers, the trucking industry is back to fighting an old problem: the lack of truckers.

In July, Trucking HR Canada published a study which noted down the impact that COVID-19 had on the industry, showing that, with 34,700 spots dropped, truck drivers accounted for about half of the people who suddenly lost their job during the first half of 2020.

The start of Q3 2020 has been a bit better, however, as most of Canada has been slowly reopening, with the trucking industry following suit. Fleets are hiring once more, especially since North American trucking companies like Titan Transline has seen a sudden upsurge in demand.

It hasn’t been easy, however. Local trucking company Robsan Transportation has been having issues finding drivers, as reported by its VP, Patricia Whitesell. She notes that the issue with COVID-19 in the US is so bad that people with the qualifications to be proper truckers don’t actually want to cross the border, preferring to stay in Canada.

Robsan Transportation’s hiring issues isn’t uncommon in the Canadian trucking industry, but it’s notably high standards have made things a bit harder. This is due to the fact that the company handles work for the nuclear industry, transporting used materials to a decontamination centre in the US.

Other companies have also been looking hard for cross-border truckers, with online sites like Indeed having classified ads for truckers with salary offers averaging at about $80,000, while only requiring as little as a year’s worth of cross-border experience, showing how high the demand for the sector currently is.

The recent decision from the Trump administration to stop issuing VISAs to Canada-employed drivers on work permits have also hurt the Canadian trucking industry, as a lot of companies rely on temporary workers in order to fill in the gaps in their staff.

That particular obstacle has been removed, but its implementation resulted in a backlog of applicants, reported by Ontario’s Andy Kahlon, President of Daytona Freight Systems.

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